Forum Posts

Anna Hegland
Mar 17, 2022
In MEDIEVAL CALL FOR PAPERS
The residual influence of the medieval is visible in today’s performance practice in various ways, yet this inheritance is perhaps not valued as highly as it might be, and oftentimes goes entirely unnoticed. Although there has been a soaring in popularity of medievalesque fantasy films and television shows such as The Witcher or Game of Thrones in recent years, as well as a renewal of interest in historical fiction based in the medieval period with television shows such as The Vikings and The White Queen, there are still significant gaps in the understanding and appreciation of the multiple ways in which the medieval has residual impact on creative performance practices today. What associations do the words ‘medieval’ and ‘Middle Ages’ trigger for those working within a performance context? How are performers currently engaging with the medieval, whether purposefully or subconsciously? What might enhanced knowledge of medieval influences offer performers today in practical terms? This volume seeks to illuminate the extensive and diverse ways in which the medieval interweaves with, and provides inspiration to, the modern in a wide variety of performance practice, by providing both critical and artistic analysis of the varying forms of medievalism in today’s theatre, dance, music, or television/film performances, as well as practical direction for modern-day performers looking to actively engage with early performance materials (in music, theatre, dance, etc) or to incorporate early tropes and structures into the creation of new medievally-inspired work. This is not limited to working with medieval themes or historical stories but also includes styles of storytelling which hearken back to early forms; many theatre techniques that are becoming popular again today have their roots in the early theatre of the medieval period, from audience participation and immersion to non-linear theatre experiences, as well as genre-busting combinations of theatre with installation, experimental technologies, and performance art. The volume invites contributors to actively engage with current creative ideas and artistic practices that relate to or are inspired by the medieval, whether through detailing specific projects, offering tips for modern performers and practitioners when engaging with medieval texts, or commenting on recent performances that draw on medieval tropes or utilise medieval materials. It interrogates the ways in which performers and performance practices variously approach the medieval today: as obscure or primitive, as interesting but distant oddity, or as a worthy and relevant source of inspiration and creative material. It offers a critical appraisal that challenges, provokes, and disrupts ideas around the medieval-as-primitive and the modern-as-innovative, offering both scholarly and practitioner perspectives to provide a useful and in-depth look at the way in which the medieval resurfaces in performance practices of all kinds today. Offerings on music, theatre, storytelling, dance or any artistic performance practice are welcome, for critical and scholarly articles of 8,000-10,000 words in length, documentations of performer training/approaches of 4,000-8,000 words (e.g., interviews, performance reviews, documentation of artistic processes), and shorter pieces of 1,500-3,000 words (e.g., artist’s notes). (These word count ranges are inclusive of notes and references.) Contributions may address, but are not limited to: The medieval in modern storytelling e.g. medieval tropes and how they’re utilised; “Artist’s notes” style essays on own medievally-rooted artistic projects; Skill and training of medieval performers; Approaching medieval materials: tips for actors/musicians/dancers; Approaching contemporary artistic performance practices (acting, storytelling, dancing, performing music etc) via a medieval lens; Analysis of acting/performances of medieval historical fiction in television, theatre, film; Tracing medievalisms in the performance of modern fantasy characters; Intersectional feminist perspectives on medieval performance practice; Critical appraisement of modern performances of medieval plays/music/stories/other material (e.g. Chester Mystery Plays, Sheffield Mysteries, Everyman (NT), Lincoln Mystery Plays); Material culture and medieval performance practice; Medieval performance and the archive (e.g. analysis of the University of Bristol Theatre Collection’s Medieval Players archive; York Mystery Plays archive; Poculi Ludique Societas (https://pls.artsci.utoronto.ca/); performances associated with REED-NE (Durham); analysis of personal archives relating to own artistic practice; etc). Please send abstracts of up to 400 words along with a short (c. 100 word) biography to Ellie Chadwick and Ollie Jones at e.chadwick@bristol.ac.uk and oliver.jones@york.ac.uk. Deadline: 31st March 2022.
0
0
1
Anna Hegland
Feb 03, 2022
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
Short notice, but there's a talk on Early Modern Witch Hunts on Monday, 7 February from Mikki Brock (Washington and Lee University). The talk is at 1:30pm CST (7:30pm GMT) and information is at the link below. https://onegarden.com/talk/mikki-brock-persecution
0
0
1
Anna Hegland
Nov 29, 2021
In CALL FOR PAPERS
Call for Papers: Edited by William David Green, Anna L. Hegland, and Sam Jermy With an afterword by Professor Tracey Hill We plan to publish a collection of essays celebrating 400 years of Thomas Middleton’s legacy as a dramatist, from his final work for the commercial stage up to the present day. When does a dramatist’s theatrical legacy begin? The answer may vary depending on the occasion. In 2016, celebrations took place worldwide to mark 400 years since the death of William Shakespeare, but further commemorative material can be expected in 2023, the year in which the First Folio, the renowned volume in which so much of Shakespeare’s dramatic canon is preserved, will similarly turn 400 years old. For Shakespeare’s contemporary Thomas Middleton, however, no such early posthumous canonization exists. Middleton died in 1627, but it was not until 2007 that the Oxford Collected Works of Middleton, the self-proclaimed “Middleton First Folio”, was published; and yet, celebration of Middleton’s drama can be seen to have begun as early as 1624, in the unprecedented popular response to what would prove to be his final work for the commercial theatres. On 6 August 1624, A Game at Chess, Middleton’s scathing satire of Anglo-Spanish relations, received its first performance by the King’s Men at the Globe Theatre on London’s Bankside. Although presented as allegory, the play’s barely concealed representation of numerous real-life political figures as the various chess pieces that make up the play’s dramatis personae (including England’s King James himself) proved highly inflammatory. The play was stopped by official intervention on 16 August, and on 18 August the Privy Council opened a prosecution against the actors and the playwright. Middleton was acquitted, but never wrote another full play for the London playhouses. Yet despite bringing about a somewhat ignominious end to Middleton’s theatrical career, before being shut down the play had already become “the greatest commercial success of the early English theatre”, having been staged for a record nine consecutive performances (excluding Sundays) and possibly having been seen by up to twenty-seven thousand theatregoers, in 1624 more than a tenth of London’s population. The play also received a significant number of written responses by readers and spectators in the months and years following its initial performances. Middleton’s full canon may not have come to be truly defined until the publication of the Oxford Collected Works in 2007, but 1624 did mark the beginning of four centuries of reader/audience response to, and celebration of, Middleton’s significance to the history of early modern drama. With a 2024 publication date in mind, we intend to publish a collection commemorating four centuries of Middleton’s theatrical legacy, taking the initial success of A Game at Chess in 1624 as our starting point. We therefore invite proposals for chapters to be included in this collected volume. Topics to consider might include, but are certainly not limited to: The legacy and impact of the 2007 Oxford Collected Works. The evolution and redefinition of Middleton’s authorial canon. The importance placed upon such issues as anonymity, authorship, and collaboration in the present-day study and textual editing of Middleton. The textual transmission, readership, and shelf life of Middleton’s works in print, taking into account both early and modern editions. Discussions of present-day performances of and practice-based engagements with Middleton’s works, or interviews with practitioners involved in such work. Online performances and other engagements with Middleton’s work from a digital humanities perspective. Middleton’s work with boy players (i.e. the Children of Paul’s; the Children of the Queen’s Revels), as well as the reimagining of such work by modern troupes of boy players, e.g. Edward’s Boys (King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon). Middleton’s relevance to present-day critical theories. Responses to major works of Middleton criticism. Middleton and the characterization of women on the stage. Examining Middleton’s contemporary attitudes to race, gender, and religion, as considered from the perspective of the twenty-first century. The importance of A Game at Chess to the study of early modern commercial theatre. Middleton's importance to the history of London. Past efforts to celebrate Middleton (i.e. the 1972 Oxford/York revival of A Game at Chess; the Beyond Shakespeare Company’s Triumph 2021 event). Finished chapters should be 5000-6000 words in length (including endnotes). Please send abstracts of 250-300 words, along with a brief bio, to Thomas.Middleton2024@gmail.com by midnight GMT on 28 February 2022. We anticipate that the deadline for the submission of completed chapters will be in September 2022. Any potential contributors wishing to discuss their chapter idea before preparing an abstract are welcome to do so (well in advance of the deadline) either by contacting us at the above email address or by contacting any of the co-editors individually. Scholars and theatre practitioners from all backgrounds and of all career levels are invited to submit abstracts, and we are also eager to receive proposals from PhD students and early career researchers.
0
0
6
Anna Hegland
Apr 28, 2021
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
UCL’s Centre for Early Modern Exchanges celebrates its tenth year anniversary this year and the launch of its PhD programme in Early Modern Studies. To mark this occasion we are bringing together researchers associated with the Centre with colleagues from the award-winning Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL) for a roundtable discussion of future directions in research, methodologies and the state of the field of early modern studies. Our focus will be on how different methodologies from connected histories to digital humanities are generating innovative perspectives on the frontiers between old and new worlds, new theoretical understandings and shedding new light on intercultural interactions in the period 1450-1800. Participants include (tbc): Zoltan Biedermann (SPLAS), Chloe Ireton (History), Victoria Moul (Greek and Latin/English), Lisa Sampson (Italian), Alexander Samson (SPLAS) and Matthew Symonds (CELL). This talk forms part of the IAS five-year anniversary festival on the theme of ‘Alternative Epistemologies’. The event will be held on 4 May 2021, from 11:30 am–1:30 pm on Zoom Register at: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/institute-of-advanced-studies/events/2021/may/virtual-ias-festival-early-modern-futures
0
0
9
Anna Hegland
Mar 01, 2021
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
You are warmly invited to the fourth Queen Mary PGRS seminar of this term on Thursday 4th March 5pm, which will be hosted on Zoom. We are delighted to be joined by Dr Todd Andrew Borlik (University of Huddersfield) who will be speaking on: Christopher Marlowe and Renaissance Malthusianism Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qmul-english-postgraduate-research-seminar-dr-todd-borlik-tickets-143083555767. Two centuries before Thomas Malthus’s demographic bombshell, a number of Renaissance intellectuals were exercised by the problem of population control. In late Elizabethan England, the fear of a mounting population crisis was particularly acute amongst the circle of Walter Ralegh and Frances Walsingham, whose intellectual orbit included an upstart playwright named Christopher Marlowe. Situating Marlovian drama alongside early modern population discourse, this paper uncovers evidence of proto-Malthusian logic in his plays Tamburlaine and Edward II. There is a chilling significance in the fact that the protagonist of the former play is a Scythian conqueror whose armies killed off an estimated 5% of the earth’s total human population. No wonder the play imagines Tamburlaine as a divine "scourge" and wields the peculiar verb "depopulate" in two separate speeches. In Edward II, a king with homosexual proclivities likewise fantasizes about a depopulated England and subverts the dynastic narrative of reproductive futurity. Significantly, the turbulence of Edward’s reign had been exacerbated by a lethal famine that marked the onset of the Little Ice Age. Rather than promoting coexistence and sustainability, Marlovian tragedy espouses an anti-humanist view of the cheapness of human life that reflects swelling concerns about overpopulation in an increasingly cramped London during an era of recurrent scarcity. Tamburlaine and Edward II thus reveal the long history of demodystopia, while affording insights into the problematic, double-edged nature of eco-demography in modern environmentalism. For more information, or to get in contact, please visit our website [link: https://queenmaryenglish.wordpress.com/] or follow us on Twitter: @QMEnglishPGRS.
0
0
6
Anna Hegland
Jan 27, 2021
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
All of these events will take place online, via Zoom. If you wish to attend could you please contact Dr Rachel Stenner in advance and she will send the links: rachel.stenner@sussex.ac.uk The Hidden Thoughts of the Soul: Exploring the Mind in the Works of Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)  Aaron Kahn, Sussex Centre for Language Studies, Mon 8th Feb, 5pm The Annual Shakespeare Lecture: Silken Terms Precise: Shakespeare’s Textile Imagination Hester Lees-Jeffries, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, Mon 22nd Feb, 5pm Rhetoric in Research at MAH  In collaboration with the History Work in Progress Seminar, Thurs 18th March, 4pm Samson’s Transgender Craze: Milton & the Legal Histories of Transphobia  Colby Gordon, Bryn Mawr College, in collaboration with the Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence & the English Colloquium, Weds 21st April, 5pm The Premodern Critical Race Studies Reading Group will meet at 5pm on these dates: week 2, Mon 1st Feb; week 6,  Mon 1st March; week 9, Mon 22nd March
0
0
16
Anna Hegland
Dec 18, 2020
In PUBLICATIONS
The journal's new editorial board has released a number of updates today (18 December), including a new website, an open call for scholarly work on the intersections between Critical Race Studies and early modern performance, author and reviewer guidelines, and a brand new contact address. Links and a full run-down of these changes are listed here, in a Twitter thread: https://twitter.com/ShaxBull/status/1339917251915464710?s=20
1
0
7
Anna Hegland
Dec 18, 2020
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
Shakespeare, Race & Pedagogy is a five-day, free, online event which seeks to share, celebrate, and reinvigorate approaches to the teaching and study of Shakespeare's plays.   Bringing together contributions from international scholars, teachers, students, and our multilingual communities to investigate Shakespeare's plays and their place in our classrooms.  Exploring a range of mediums including translations, the Everything to Everybody collection, and British Sign Language in the classroom as exciting opportunities to teach, study, and enjoy Shakespeare's plays. Revisiting and building upon international scholarship, research, and education, Shakespeare, Race & Pedagogy aims to challenge perceptions and address the contextual complexities of language and race, creating a dialogue between the past and the present to include and inspire our current and future scholars, students, teachers. Registration and a full schedule available here: https://www.crowdcast.io/e/shakespeare-race-/register
0
0
7
Anna Hegland
Dec 01, 2020
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
The final #SRSlyGood Society for Renaissance Studies seminar of 2020 is coming up, 16 December, 18.00GMT (don't worry- not the last ever). A conversation with Tina Asmussen (Bergbau-Museum Bochum; Katherine Hunt (York); Emily Rowe (Newcastle); Alison Wright (UCL); chaired by Allison Stielau (UCL). More info and the Crowdcast signup here: https://www.rensoc.org.uk/event/thinking-with-metals-in-early-modern-europe/
0
0
5
Anna Hegland
Dec 01, 2020
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
The International Spenser Society (https://twitter.com/SpenserSociety) are pleased to announce #GettingStartedWithSpenser, a workshop on developing inclusive teaching resources for reading Spenser in terms of race, gender, class, ecocriticism, and more. Sign up here for the event on Dec 15th, 9am PST/12pm EST/5pm GMT: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/getting-started-with-spenser-tickets-130125572089
0
0
7
Anna Hegland
Dec 01, 2020
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
Registration is now open for the colloquium, Persianisms: Cultural Encounters with the Anglophone World (10-12 Dec 2020)! You can find the registration form and programme here: https://sites.google.com/york.ac.uk/persianisms-colloquium All are welcome!
0
0
4
Anna Hegland
Dec 01, 2020
In MISCELLANEOUS
In Shakespeare and Early Modern Studies there is significant under-representation of faculty of colour employed in permanent positions in UK universities. There are various reasons for this: institutional racism in higher education; unconscious and conscious bias in selection of candidates for study and employment; lack of opportunities for students of colour to progress to postgraduate study; lack of funding opportunities; absence of networking and socialisation opportunities for postgraduates of colour; and Shakespeare and early modern literature/drama is not consistently presented in schools and universities as an inclusive site of enquiry. The Early Modern Scholars of Colour Network is an anti-racist collective that will aim to address some of these challenges while working to nurture and enable students, ECRs and academics of colour to develop academic and pedagogic networks; find and create intellectual spaces that are inclusive and progressive; and enable inclusive practices in the discipline through mentoring. Some of our key objectives include: Raising awareness and calling for accountability for anti-racist structures at academic institutions Offering and facilitating mentorship for scholars of colour Supporting the research and professional development of scholars of colour Devising and supporting projects that actively engage with communities to create pipelines for undergraduate students of colour to enter postgraduate studies in our disciplines Promote the study of race and social justice issues in fields of pre-modern literature and history The Early Modern Scholars of Colour Network is not only anti-racist but is also firmly anti-oppression and anti-exclusion. Membership is open to all who share the anti-racist principles. It is open to individuals, departments and institutions. It welcomes scholars who would like to provide allyship and actively work towards creating a more inclusive community of scholars. Logistic and administrative support will be provided to the network by the London Shakespeare Centre, a centre of the Arts & Humanities Research Institute at King's College London, and Shakespeare's Globe. The network will be steered by (in alphabetical order): Shani Bans (UCL), Nour El Gazzaz (RHUL), Prof. Farah Karim-Cooper (KCL/Globe), Wendy Lennon (BHAM), Hassana Moosa (KCL), Prof. Lucy Munro (KCL), and Dr. Will Tosh (Globe). If you would like to register your interest in this network and its activities or offer any suggestions please do so here: https://forms.gle/PsRbSAttQzGDAhdN9 Register Your Interest https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfMANAA5heOhzcDnsxkz6e2NoDO6DywDgLlHHel_UQPJhrSxw/viewform You can also get in touch with the network directly at emscolour@gmail.com and on twitter @EMSColourUK We are excited to begin work to create positive transformation in the fields of Shakespeare and Early Modern studies in the UK.
0
0
218
Anna Hegland
Dec 01, 2020
In CONFERENCES & SEMINARS
This meeting of the UCL English Early Modern English Reading Group will consider the various interpretative challenges posed by the Essays, and how their English readers and editors grappled with their manifold, Protean form. More information at: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/early-modern/events/2020/dec/emerg-online-montaigne-and-essay-england
0
0
3
Anna Hegland
Admin
More actions