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Roisin Astell
Dec 06, 2020
In MEDIEVAL CONFERENCES
This is a live online event. Please register for more details. The platform and log in details will be sent to attendees at least 48 hours before the event. Please note that registration closes 30 minutes before the event start time.  If you have not received the log in details or have any further queries, please contact researchforum@courtauld.ac.uk.  Travelling Objects, Travelling People aims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France, the Low Countries, and eventually Renaissance Italy, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference revisits the dynamics of artistic communication in late medieval Iberia, placing the peninsula in a global network, from Flanders to Florence, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together contributions from international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, this event seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to investigate moments of encounter, conflict, and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.   Conference Programme:   Day 1 – Thursday 10th December, 1pm (GMT) Opening remarks   Panel 1: Nexus Objects  Bart Fransen (KIK/IRPA), Two Fragments from the Predella of Juan de Flandes’ Altarpiece for the University Chapel in Salamanca Alexander Röstel (Bibliotheca Hertziana, Rome) and Caterina Fioravanti (Independent Scholar), Lorenzo Ghiberti, Rodrigo Borgia and the Cradle of the Iberian Renaissance: The Retrochoir and Chancel of Valencia Cathedral in the Fifteenth Century   Francisco Montes (Universidad de Sevilla), The Jamuga of Cortés. An Islamic Throne Chair for the Conquest of Mexico Break   Panel 2: Transmission and Image Chains  Vanessa Antunes (Universidade de Lisboa), Travelling from Flanders to Portugal Via Techniques and Materials: the Portuguese Copy of the Painter Jorge Afonso to Quentin Metsys’s Painting The Angel Appearing to Saints Clara, Colette and Agnes   Maria Sanz Julian (Universidad de Zaragoza), Original, Copies and Iconographic Traces in Illustrated Books at the End of the Middle Ages  Nelleke de Vries (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München), Portable Passion. The Dissemination of Martin Schongauer’s Artistic Inventions in Spain  Break  Keynote: Fernando António Baptista Pereira (Universidade de Lisboa), Importing Painting, Sculpture and other artistic objects from the Low Countries to Madeira during the Cycle of the ‘White Gold’  Day 2 – Friday 11th December, 1pm (GMT) Welcome   Panel 3: Not All Those Who Wander Are Lost  Piers Baker-Bates (The Open University), ‘In the Spanish Fashion’: Iberian Artists Travelling in Italy 1450–1550  Eduardo Lamas Delgado (KIK/IRPA), Looking for Italy in Castile: the Iberian Career of Willem van Santvoort, a Netherlandish Assistant of Alonso Berruguete  Marco Silvestri (Universität Paderborn), Family Ties and Diffusion of Architectural Knowledge: Migration, Networks and the Establishment of Two Sixteenth-Century Spanish Stonemasons in Latin America   Break  Panel 4: Stones Don’t Move   Joana Balsa (Universidade de Lisboa), Ricardo Nunes (Universidade de Lisboa), All Saints’ Hospital in Lisbon: Artistic Exchanges in the Context of Hospital Architecture in the Renaissance  Elena Paulino (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), Negotiating the American space: Travelling Artists and Local Elites in the Architectural Configuration of Santo Domingo at the End of the Fifteenth Century  Kelley Helmstutler di Dio (University of Vermont), Labor, Transportation and Technological Systems of Sculpture Exchange in Early Modern Europe  Break  Panel 5: Reconsidering Influence   Encarna Montero (Universitat de València):  Recomposing and Reframing the Northern Influence in Aragonese Painting ca. 1400: the Hazardous Case of Marçal de Sas Eva March (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), The Itinerancy of Jan van Eyck’s Models: (Re) Creating Images of Power in Late Medieval Catalonia  Maria Vittoria Spissu (Università di Bologna), A Missing Ring in the Iberian Marian Atlas: Transferring the Cult of the Seven Sorrows from the Habsburg Netherlands to Mediterranean Kingdoms in the Early Modern Age  Closing remarks  This event is supported by the Society for Renaissance Studies. Find out more here. Organised by: Costanza Beltrami (University of Oxford) and Sylvia Alvares-Correa (University of Oxford)
Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art & Artists of Late-Medieval & Renaissance Iberia & Beyond, c. 1400–1550, 10-11 December 2020 content media
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Roisin Astell
Dec 06, 2020
In MEDIEVAL CONFERENCES
Join English Heritage and the British Archaeological Association for this major online conference focused on Aelred, abbot of Rievaulx between 1147 and 1167. Called ‘our Aelred’ by his monks, the abbot was one of the most important monastic leaders of the Middle Ages and remains an inspirational figure to this day. Bringing together leading scholars and heritage professionals, this conference provides a unique opportunity to examine Aelred’s impact on the architectural development of Rievaulx, his role in the Cistercian settlement of northern England and his activities as an author. Speakers will address the abbot’s impact in the wider monastic world and Aelred’s legacy, including his veneration as a saint and how his extraordinary life and achievements can be interpreted for 21st-century visitors to Rievaulx. The event also features a round-table discussion focused on debates about Aelred’s sexuality. The conference has been scheduled to coincide with Aelred’s feast day on 12 January. Download the programme and register here. Conference Programme (GMT) Day 1: Monday 11 January 2021, Vigil of the Feast of St Aelred, Abbot & Confessor 12:00 – 12:10 pm: Welcome and Introduction: Anna Eavis Beginnings 12:10 – 12:30: Janet Burton, ‘The Cistercian Settlement of Northern England’ 12:30 – 12:50: Stuart Harrison, ‘Aelred’s Inheritance: the monastic buildings of Abbot William’ 12:50 – 13:00: Questions Theology & Patronage 13:00-13:20: Marsha Dutton, ‘Finding God in the Memory According to Aelred of Rievaulx’ 13:20-13:50: Peter Fergusson, ‘The Context of Aelred’s Rievaulx Buildings and Precinct Development in the 1150s’ 13:50 – 14:00: Questions DAY 2: Tuesday 12 January 2021, Feast Feast of St Aelred, Abbot & Confessor 12:00 – 12:10pm: Welcome and Introduction History & Sainthood 12:10 – 12:30: Elizabeth Freeman, ‘Aelred of Rievaulx: the future-looking historian’ 12:30 – 12:50: Emilia Jamroziak, ‘Aelred of Rievaulx and other Cistercian Saints in the Late Middle Ages’ 12:50 – 13:00: Questions The Wider Context 13:00 – 13:20: Brian Golding, ‘The abbot, the bishop, and the earl: Aelred and the early years of Revesby abbey’ 13:20 – 13:50: Alexandra Gajewski, ‘Aelred, Rievaulx and the French Connections’ 13:50 – 14:00: Questions Break: 14:00 – 14:45 Aelred in the 21st Century 14:45 – 15:00: Michael Carter, ‘Our Aelred’: a Rievaulx interpretation for 2021’ 15:00 – 16:00: Dominique Bouchard, Marsha Dutton and Katherine Harvey: ‘Aelred and Monastic Sexuality: a round table discussion’
Online Conference: ‘‘Our Aelred’: Man, Monk & Saint’, English Heritage & the British Archaeological Association, 11-12 January 2021 content media
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Roisin Astell
Dec 04, 2020
In MEDIEVAL CALL FOR PAPERS
Adding a call for papers could not be any easier on the MEMSLib forum. Here is a handy guide to help you out. Step 1. Click on 'Create New Post' and then 'Start a Discussion'. Step 2. A new window will open. Step 3. Title: Add the name of your call for papers, the date it takes place and the deadline for submissions (this last bit is especially important!) Step 4. Add all the relevant information in the main body of the post, eg. information about the conference, key contact details, who to send abstracts to etc. Step 5. Make your call for papers more enticing by adding an image! On the bottom left you will see a camera image - click on this and choose the image you would like to upload. Step 6. Finished? Press publish! Here's a rough guide video to help you out:
Adding a call for papers post - start here! content media
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Roisin Astell
Dec 04, 2020
In RECORDED EVENTS
This year the conference took place online via Zoom across two days. Whilst we would have loved to have hosted the conference in-person, the silver lining is that we were able to have scholars and academics across the world attend and present their work. So fear not if you missed out – as we recorded the conference and you can view the panels here.
British Archaeological Association Postgraduate Conference 2020 recordings content media
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Roisin Astell
Nov 30, 2020
In MEDIEVAL LECTURES & SEMINARS
Join the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies upcoming lecture: 'New Approaches to Medieval Historiography'. Chaired by Dr Ed Roberts (Kent) with Prof Julia Marvin (Notre Dame), Prof Jesse Torgerson (Wesleyan), Prof Elizabeth Tyler (York), and Prof Björn Weiler (Aberystwyth). Scholars of medieval historical writing have come to appreciate an array of lenses through which to view and consider their texts: audience expectation, reception, compilation, incompleteness, fictionality, contradiction, political imperative, authorial individuality, and more. Across medieval societies, the past was a constructio11 that could be made 'useful', but it was also supposed to be truthful, or at least credible. The past was always present, yet this 'presence' was constantly being contested, distilled, recycled, and mythologised to myriad ends. This seminar showcases how scholarly approaches continue to be refined and combined by examining medieval historical cultures in an explicitly comparative setting. The panel brings together four distinct perspectives on history writing from across the geographical and chronological breadth of the medieval world. Jesse Torgerson looks at Byzantine chronography in the ninth century; Elizabeth Tyler examines the reception of historical writing in tenth- and eleventh-century England; Björn Weiler explores twelfth-century Lotharingian chronicles; and Julia Marvin examines vernacular historiography in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England. Get in touch with MEMS on twitter for the zoom link.
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Roisin Astell
Nov 30, 2020
In RECORDED EVENTS
This episode takes a closer look at one of the treasures of the British Library collection, the Sherborne Missal. Made in the early 1400s, it's a titan of a manuscript, weighing as much as the average five-year-old child and containing more paintings than many art galleries, including numerous tiny portraits of the patrons who commissioned it and the monks who laboured over its decoration. The episode focuses on the Easter Sunday page, resplendent with intensely coloured images drawn from both the bible and the natural world - and sheltering hairy, combative wodewose in its margins. To see the high-resolution image, visit www.bbc.co.uk/movingpictures and follow the link to explore the Sherborne Missal. Interviewees: Kathleen Doyle, Eleanor Jackson, Alixe Bovey, Paul Binski, Patricia Lovett Listen to the episode here.
BBC Radio 4: Moving Pictures: The Sherborne Missal content media
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Roisin Astell
Nov 30, 2020
In RECORDED EVENTS
You can watch the British Archaeological Association's 2020-2021 Lecture series over on their youtube channel here or below, starting with Professor Tim Ayers' lecture. 8 October 2020: BAA Monthly Lecture, Tim Ayers 4 November 2020: BAA Monthly Lecture, Anna Eavis
British Archaeological Association 2020-2021 Lecture Series content media
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Roisin Astell
Nov 30, 2020
In MEDIEVAL LECTURES & SEMINARS
Registration closes on 1 December – book your tickets now. This workshop showcases medieval manuscripts of the Book of Psalms. Join Matthew Holford, Tolkien Curator of Medieval Manuscripts at the Bodleian Library, and Lesley Smith, Professor of Intellectual History at the University of Oxford, to learn how manuscripts can help us understand the central place of the Psalms in medieval culture. Find out more here.
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Roisin Astell
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